Improved Peterborough City Hospital given ‘good’ rating in latest CQC inspection

Peterborough City Hospital, Bretton. Photo: Peterborough Telegraph
Peterborough City Hospital, Bretton. Photo: Peterborough Telegraph

Peterborough City Hospital has had its rating bumped up to ‘good’ by inspectors after making improvements.

The latest report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) indicates that the hospital is no longer rated as ‘requires improvement’.

The inspectors also decided to rate Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundations Trust as ‘good’ having previously rated it as ‘requires improvement’ as well.

The new CQC report, issued today (Monday, July 27) highlighted improvements at the hospital’s Emergency Department which has started meeting it’s Accident and Emergency waiting time target in the past three months.

The report indicated that: urgent and emergency services, services for children and young people and end of life care were all good, although medical care continues to require improvement.

Areas of outstanding care included the engagement with children and young people, while the Trust was commended for meeting face-to-face an increasing numbers of patients to discuss concerns or complaints.

However, the Trust was told it must “ensure records are accurate and updated to reflect the needs of patients and that care is given in line with records.”

The Trust was also told to make sure medicine wards are stored correctly and call bells answered in a timely way.

The previous inspection at the city hospital was in March 2014, while Stamford & Rutland Hospital was rated as ‘good’ in May that year.

Stephen Graves, who took over as the Trust’s chief executive last September, said: “It is pleasing to see that the action plan we put in place following our original inspection in March 2014 has delivered the intended results.

“The fact the Trust has stepped up a level to be rated as ‘good’ is testament to the efforts of our staff across both hospitals to ensure our patients receive good quality care.”

The latest CQC inspection at the city hospital was in May and was a follow-up inspection having previously undertaken a comprehensive inspection in March 2014.

Mr Graves added: “The follow-up inspection recognised areas of improvements since the inspection last year and this report gives us the drive to develop those good service areas into outstanding ones for the future.

“We also know that in some areas there is still more work to be done. We appreciate that we don’t always ‘get it right’ for some patients and we will continue to work on our action plans to ensure we carry on making improvements in care quality across the Trust.

“Prior to the follow-up inspection, work had already begun on improving areas noted in the initial inspection report. The medical and emergency departments have made a number of service improvements since March 2014.

“There has been a focus on our discharge processes, which involves working with our health and social care partners across the five local authority areas in the Trust’s catchment area.

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank our staff for their consistent dedication to patient care.”

The Trust had its annual public meeting last Thursday where a deficit of £38.5 million for the past year was recorded, although improvements at the Emergency Department were also highlighted and the Trust indicated success in meeting other government targets.

View: The full CQC reports.