RAF Wittering personnel support NATO Baltic Air Policing mission

The convoy with spares and equipment for the Baltic Air Policing mission EMN-160804-144809001
The convoy with spares and equipment for the Baltic Air Policing mission EMN-160804-144809001

A4 Force Squadrons from RAF Wittering were on the move again last week in support of the NATO Baltic Air Policing mission in Estonia.

Trucks from No. 2 Mechanical Transport Squadron have left the Cambridgeshire station to collect vital spares and equipment for the Royal Air Force Typhoon jets which guard the airspace over the three Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and 
Lithuania.

Their next stop will be Ämari Air Base in Estonia where four Typhoons from the Royal Air Force’s No. 140 Expeditionary Air Wing are deployed. It’s a journey that will take the RAF’s drivers around northern Europe through several thousand miles in potentially challenging conditions.

The chefs of No. 3 Mobile Catering Squadron (3MCS) will bring a much needed taste of home to the RAF personnel in Estonia in the coming weeks.

Familiar and well prepared recipes have a massively beneficial effect on morale and the team from 3MCS will offer a selection of well-known British foods to complement the eastern European fare offered at Ämari Air 
Base.

No. 1 Expeditionary Logistics Squadron (1EL Sqn) makes sure the Royal Air Force contingent of the Baltic Air Policing mission has all the right equipment in all the proper quantities.

Managing the deployed supply group is a complex task.

A team from 1 EL Squadron deploys with practically every overseas mission to ensure the Royal Air Force has enough of the correct equipment and materials in order to achieve its military objectives. The Squadron must reconcile the costs to National Audit Office standards after the mission.

Group Captain Rich Pratley is the Station Commander at RAF Wittering and Commanding Officer of the A4 Force. He said: “Deployed operations are what the A4 Force is all about, this is what we do. We feed personnel, move the equipment needed to keep the aircraft flying and control the material accounts.

“Almost everything the Royal Air Force needs to sustain its operations abroad comes from the deployable logistics and engineering squadrons. The success of the RAF contribution to Baltic Air Policing is in no small part due to the A4 Force units.”